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Exploring the Postpartum Period Through a Four Part Series

The postpartum period, also known as the 4th trimester, can be an intimidating period of time that can leave many expecting and new mothers in doubt. We will explore these questions through the help of our four-part series where we interviewed real mothers and spoke to them about their experience with postpartum blues.

The postpartum period, also known as the 4th trimester, can be an intimidating period of time that can leave many expecting and new mothers in doubt. Furthermore, up to 80% of mothers experience postpartum blues, which is a period of about two weeks after giving birth when a woman might feel exhausted, extremely sensitive emotionally, and overall not like herself. We’re here to help you answer your questions about this time period. When is the postpartum period technically over? What can you expect if you have postpartum blues? How can you help yourself to feel better and be more prepared for your postpartum experience? We will explore these questions through the help of our four-part series where we interviewed real mothers and spoke to them about their experience with postpartum blues.

When is the Postpartum Period Over and What is the Timeline of Baby Blues?

According to WHO1, the postpartum period starts on the day you give birth, and lasts for about 6 weeks. During this time, a mother is going through a load of changes, mentally and physically,– and not just adapting to the new little one in her life. Upon giving birth, there is a sharp and sudden drop in hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, which is the main precursor to postpartum blues, also known as baby blues. Not every mother will experience baby blues, but it’s estimated that roughly 80% do. The symptoms of baby blues include mild mood swings, tearfulness, anxiety, fatigue, and irritability. These symptoms normally begin a few days after giving birth, and can last up to two weeks. However, if symptoms persist or worsen, or a mother is having thoughts of harming herself or her baby, it is very important to talk to a medical professional, as this can be a sign of postpartum depression. 2 If you or someone you know is experiencing symptoms of postpartum depression, you can contact 833-TLC-MAMA, the National Maternal Mental Health Hotline, any time and any day for support.

What Can I Expect to Feel if I have Baby Blues?

We have already mentioned the symptoms of baby blues, but we recognize that it can help to hear it directly from other mothers who have experienced it for themselves. However, it’s important to know that everyone’s experience is different, and what might be true for one mother may not apply to all mothers. One mom who we interviewed, Nychole, described her mood swings for us. “ One minute I would be fine, and someone would ask me a question and it would bring on an emotional reaction for me. I had never experienced that before.” Because of the mood swings and sensitivity during this period, baby blues can also be seen as isolating, as told by another mom, Suzie. “I started feeling kind of lonely and isolated because I just felt like no one else that I know of really went through this.” Baby blues can also make moms feel unlike themselves, as we saw with one of the mother’s we interviewed, Ryan. “You legitimately feel like a different person”. Moms might feel like this for a number of reasons, but for her, it was caused by the emotional sensitivity and anxiety she was facing due to baby blues.

How Can I Help Myself?

After reading the insights from the mothers’ stories we’ve mentioned above, you might feel nervous about giving birth and facing postpartum blues. But, you are not alone, and there are ways to support yourself postpartum so that you can enjoy this period with your new baby to the best possible degree. So what can you do?

Pre-postpartum preparation:

Preparation, like in every circumstance, is also key here. Preparing for giving birth, not just with stocking up on baby supplies, but with establishing a circle of support, is crucial. Relying on the people around you is not a weakness, it’s a strength. Because as the age-old saying goes, it really does take a village.

Self-care Postpartum:

This might not be what you think. We’re not talking about foot rubs and face masks (although, if that’s what relaxes you, go for it!), rather, taking time to be alone and truly rest. Whether this means having a cup of tea in the morning, going for a short walk, or taking a nap, it’s important to remember that self-care is baby care. The more energized and at peace with yourself you are, the better you will be able to pour energy into your baby.

Blues Away®:

Our last recommendation for taking care of yourself in the postpartum period is the usage of our postpartum mood support dietary supplement. It’s a novel 4 shake regimen taken over 3 days to support your mood after giving birth.* It should be taken beginning on the third day postpartum, so it’s important to order it before you give birth (exclusively on Amazon)– we know how busy things can get!

We hope that the stories shared and the insights on the postpartum period and baby blues will be of value to you. You can find more resources on our blog page, as well as watch all of the full episodes of our interviews with mothers directly on our website. Remember, you’ve got this mama!

References

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.